Natalio Fejerman [1933-2018]


Natalio Fejerman, leading Argentine child neurologist and epileptologist, died on Thursday, March 29, after a short sickbed. He was 84 years old.  Natalio Fejerman was born in Buenos Aires on November 8 th , 1933. He earned his medical degree from Medical School in Buenos Aires in 1957 and started his professional training at the Children's Hospital Ricardo Gutierrez in Buenos Aires and later at Boston Children's Hospital under Prof. Cesare Lombroso. He was the head of the Department of Neu...
Continue reading

Lilly Dubowitz (1930-2016)

Lilly Dubowitz (1930-2016)

A phrase was introduced to neonatal units in the 1970s, “Have you Dubowitzed the baby?”, which referred to a new, accurate technique for estimating the gestational age or period of time between conception and birth of a newborn child, pioneered by Lilly and Victor Dubowitz, a feisty Hungarian and her South African husband. Both were based in England. Their method was simple but groundbreaking: they tested a baby for a number of neurological signs that change as it matures. Until then, there was no clear-cut method for assessing whether a small baby was premature or undernourished.

Continue reading

Professor Yavuz Renda (1932-2015)

Professor Yavuz Renda (1932-2015)

The founding father of Turkish Child Neurology, Professor Yavuz Renda (b.1932) has passed away on the 24th of July, 2015 after a long illness. His family roots aided Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in the construction of Modern Turkey in 1923.

Continue reading

Charles Kennedy

Charles Kennedy

Charles Kennedy, one of the first child neurologists in the USA, passed away on October 6, 2015 in Maine at the age of 95 following a brief illness. Born in Buffalo, NY, he attended Nichols School and later Deerfield Academy. He graduated from Princeton University with honors in Chemistry in 1942.

Continue reading

Professor Jean Aicardi (1926-2015)

Professor Jean Aicardi (1926-2015)

Jean Aicardi was arguably the greatest child neurologist of the modern era, an internationally renowned French child neurologist who wrote his textbooks in English. His name will live on in the two separate conditions that he described—Aicardi syndrome and Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). His name will also live on through his several textbooks, all written in English, and through his friends, colleagues, and pupils (over 100 fellows trained with him) throughout the world. Most of his work was done in Paris, but in later years he also held posts in Miami, Florida (as Visiting Scientist), at the Institute of Child Health (as Honorary Professor of Child Neurology), and in Great Ormond Street Hospital (Honorary Consultant Neurologist), London, UK.

Continue reading

pleasedonate